Error loading page.
Try refreshing the page. If that doesn't work, there may be a network issue, and you can use our self test page to see what's preventing the page from loading.
Learn more about possible network issues or contact support for more help.

The California Gold Rush and the Coming of the Civil War

by Leonard L. Richards
Jeff Riggenbach

Audiobook

In this revelatory study, award-winning historian Leonard L. Richards makes clear the links between the Gold Rush and the Civil War.

Richards explains how Southerners envisioned California as a new market for slaves for digging for gold, schemed to tie California to the South via railroad, and imagined splitting off the state’s southern half for a slave state. We see how the Gold Rush influenced other regional and national squabbles, and we meet renegade New York Democrat David Broderick, who became a force in San Francisco politics in 1849, and his archrival, William Gwin, a major Mississippi slaveholder.

Richards recounts the political battles alongside the fiery California feuds, duels, and, perhaps, outright murders as the state came shockingly close to being divided in two.


Expand title description text
Publisher: Blackstone Audio
Edition: Unabridged

OverDrive Listen audiobook

  • ISBN: 9781481581653
  • File size: 290647 KB
  • Release date: January 1, 2006
  • Duration: 10:04:28

MP3 audiobook

  • ISBN: 9781481581653
  • File size: 290647 KB
  • Release date: January 23, 2007
  • Duration: 10:04:28
  • Number of parts: 9


Loading
Formats

OverDrive Listen audiobook
MP3 audiobook

subjects

History Nonfiction

Languages

English

Levels

Text Difficulty:9-12

In this revelatory study, award-winning historian Leonard L. Richards makes clear the links between the Gold Rush and the Civil War.

Richards explains how Southerners envisioned California as a new market for slaves for digging for gold, schemed to tie California to the South via railroad, and imagined splitting off the state’s southern half for a slave state. We see how the Gold Rush influenced other regional and national squabbles, and we meet renegade New York Democrat David Broderick, who became a force in San Francisco politics in 1849, and his archrival, William Gwin, a major Mississippi slaveholder.

Richards recounts the political battles alongside the fiery California feuds, duels, and, perhaps, outright murders as the state came shockingly close to being divided in two.


Expand title description text